Grace

I struggle with legalism.

I struggle with pride.

I struggle with wanting everything to look good, whether or not it is on the inside.

But God is constantly pulling me into grace.

Merriam-Webster defines grace as unmerited divine assistance given to humans for their regeneration or sanctification. It’s getting something—Someone—I don’t deserve. Grace is what picked me up from a broken, dirty state of selfishness and restored me.

I was made new in the eyes of God, even when I couldn’t quite see it myself.

Grace is not given just once; it’s received daily.

Grace is the divine assistance I’m given to accomplish anything I face in this life. Grace allows me to let go of my selfishness, and to pursue His Holiness.

“Through [Jesus] we received grace and apostleship to bring about the obedience of faith for the sake of His name among all the nations” (Rom. 1:5, ESV).

“For from His fullness we have all received, grace upon grace” (John 1:16, ESV).

No matter how much I strive, I didn’t earn grace and I can’t sustain it.

My mistakes aren’t surprises or forks in the road to Jesus.

Ultimately, my mistakes are reminders of how important and costly His grace really is. I am reminded of this in Galatians 3:1–6:

You foolish Galatians! Who has bewitched you? Before your very eyes Jesus Christ was clearly portrayed as crucified. I would like to learn just one thing from you: Did you receive the Spirit by the works of the law, or by believing what you heard? Are you so foolish? After beginning by means of the Spirit, are you now trying to finish by means of the flesh? Have you experienced so much in vain—if it really was in vain? So again I ask, does God give you his Spirit and work miracles among you by the works of the law, or by your believing what you heard? So also Abraham “believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness.”

Grace is the divine power, the finished work, the substance of what we believe by faith. I need grace daily, and my God is so faithful to give it when I ask.

The longer I walk with Jesus, the more I realize how costly and miraculous His grace is.

When I’m asked to show grace to others—real, sacrificial grace—I often don’t want to. Everything in me tenses up, and I want to point to all the reasons why it doesn’t make sense.

Then I remember: “Freely you have received; freely give” (Matt. 10:8b).

Jesus, you’re still making me new. What amazing grace!

 

Hannah Gies

Hannah Gies

 Hannah is a Toccoa Falls College graduate and the youth leader at Valley Alliance Church in Nelliston, New York. She has a passion to help young people meet Jesus in a life-changing way. In her free time, Hannah enjoys healthy baking, spending time with people, and visiting coffee shops with her husband, Josh (except when the CDC recommends social distancing!). You can read more of Hannah’s writings on her blog, breathelioness.blog.

Five Responses to “Grace”

  1. ”When I’m asked to show grace to others—real, sacrificial grace—I often don’t want to.” Yes! This application you brought out at the end is at the very heart of the struggle. Grace does not make sense. They don’t deserve it, and neither did we. If we don’t extend grace to others it means we don’t realize, or don’t appreciate, or have forgotten how much we ourselves were forgiven. Thanks for your encouraging thoughts, Hannah.

  2. Good opener, hannah. I didn’t feel like reading, but i liked the rythm and am glad i read it. Inspiring, thank you.

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